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High Point’s Historic Buildings Tour

January 22, 2019

 

Eclectic is certainly a word that comes to mind when trying to describe High Point’s downtown architecture. Our city’s long and storied history has mixed with some of the world’s most imaginative and innovative minds to form this creative community we call home. Walking down the streets you will see each building has such a unique look and history. Many of those buildings have, over time, changed purposes, creating something completely new and different from its original use. Today we’d like to take you on a visual tour of some of our favorite restored buildings throughout High Point. Enjoy our armchair stroll!

Buzzi Space

Photography by ZoZo Photography
Photography by ZoZo Photography

Originally, this 100-year-old factory building was the Pickett Cotton Mill. Closed in 1985 due to foreign competition, this fantastic old building sat empty for years until Buzzi Space, a European furniture company, chose it as the new home for their U.S. headquarters. Today it is a thriving throw back to a bygone era. (And our favorite part? They ride bikes to get around the mill!)

COHAB

Photography by ZoZo Photography
Photography by ZoZo Photography

Housed in a renovated hosiery mill complex, COHAB is one of High Point’s new collaborative spaces. COHAB’s goal is to turn this massive complex into something new—a space where designers, exhibitors, thought-leaders, and community members can intermingle in one creative place year-round.

J.H. Adams Inn

Photography by ZoZo Photography

Constructed in 1918, this home was originally the private residence of John Hampton Adams, a prominent local industrialist. Now it serves as a boutique hotel and restaurant in the heart of Uptown.  The Adams Inn is known for its grand staircase, richly-carved moldings, marble fireplaces, beautiful wood floors and elegantly furnished rooms.

Radio Building

Photography by High Point Market Authority

This eight-story building has been at the heart of High Point’s business community since it opened in 1923. The Radio Building was originally named The Commercial National Bank. It is now one of the landmark office buildings in downtown High Point, housing businesses and showrooms, and the iconic WFMR radio station. The building features a spiral marble staircase and the original bank vault with its 16-inch thick door weighing 24 tons!

Center Theatre

Photography by High Point Market Authority

In the tradition of the grand movie and performance venues of old, the Center Theatre served as a cultural hub in High Point for decades before shutting down in 1981. During its heyday, Elvis Presley even performed here…twice!  (Who knew?! High Point was quite the Love Me Tender hot spot!)  Now, the Center Theatre has a new life as a bustling furniture showroom in the heart of downtown.

Fire Station 4

Photography by Alisha Schwanke

Originally built to protect High Point’s Emerywood neighborhood, Fire Station 4 was completed in March 1925 by J. O’Conner. It has had many iterations since, but now this iconic building is home to Monkee’s, a fashionable and fun store for ladies’ apparel and more. It is the latest location for this East Coast chain and the High Point community is excited to have them here.

Sheraton Towers

Built in 1920 as a luxury hotel, the Sheraton Towers building has seen its fair share of famous visitors.  It even almost saw John F. Kennedy and his touring party! When inclimate weather threatened to prevent JFK from reaching the Asheville airport, Sheraton Towers became Plan B. The hotel even prepared 150 sandwiches and 50 rooms in preparation! Although the inclimate weather cleared in Asheville, JFK’s almost visit remained a storied memory for those connected to Sheraton Towers. In 1982, the building was converted into apartments and another complete renovation took place in 2011. Happily, this historic hotel is now home to an active senior living community.

Discovering our High Points,

The HP Discovered Team

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